Green Buzz

At Issue: What About Climate Change?

How concerned should we be about climate change? Threats such as ISIS, ebola and shaky economies seem much more immediate and tangible than global warming. We asked two of Tech’s top experts in the field to discuss the issue.

Uncertainty Doesn’t Mean We Shouldn’t Take Action

By Judith Curry

Last New Coal Plant in U.S.?

Dean Alford, EE 76, never expected to become the face of a coal plant.

A clean-cut businessman with snow-white hair and a matching mustache, he looks comfortable in a tailored suit with a pocket-square intricately styled into three points over his chest. Despite his manicured appearance, he has an easy presence and comfortable charm. His big smile and Southern accent that’s equal parts folksy and sophisticated are a testament to his many years in politics.

School of Architecture studio leads the way on Mission Zero Corridor project

A School of Architecture graduate design and research studio created a vision, a framework, and a series of projects for the Ray Anderson Memorial Highway, which is a 16-mile segment of I-85 from the Alabama/Georgia border to the interchange with I-185 leading to Columbus. The Memorial Highway was recently designated the "Mission Zero Corridor" by the Georgia State Legislature. This designation is a commemoration of Ray Anderson’s legacy of sustainable industry with Mission Zero for the Interface Corporation.

Flip the Switchgrass

Although fuel cells powered by methanol or hydrogen have been well studied, existing low temperature fuel cell technologies cannot directly use biomass because of the lack of an effective catalyst system for polymeric materials.

Parking and Transportation Services Wins Electric Vehicle Charging Grant

Georgia Tech’s Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) has been selected to receive a grant of $39,675 by the Georgia Environmental Finance Authority for the purchase and installation of electric vehicle (EV) chargers.

These funds will help Georgia Tech expand its EV charging program by installing nine dual-port Level II chargers in visitor-accessible locations including near the Student Center, Bobby Dodd Stadium, and Howey Physics.

Students Strive to Build Environmentally Friendly Camaro

In designing a car, creativity is the rope that ties all the different parts together. It’s responsible for the design, look, and feel of the car. When the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asks you to expand upon those features to make a car more environmentally friendly, those creative components have to be taken a step further.

A Little Sheep Goes a Long Way in Managing Kudzu

Some things are best left to nature, and controlling invasive vegetation is no exception.

Using an environmentally friendly approach to rid an area on campus of kudzu, Georgia Tech is hosting several four-legged, wooly friends over the next two weeks to assist in removing — or eating — the rapidly growing weed.

Design 2015 Earth Day T-Shirt, Win $500

At the 2015 Earth Day celebration, hundreds of people will receive T-shirts that they'll wear on campus for years to come — and they could be sporting your design.

The Earth Day planning committee is holding a design contest for this year's T-shirt around the theme "Small Acts, Big Impacts." The winning designer will earn $500. 

Community Members Wanted to Plan Earth Day 2015

Georgia Tech hosts one of the largest Earth Day celebrations in the Southeast, with live music, more than 100 exhibitors, a green market, alternative fuel vehicle displays, environmental awards, interactive green challenges, and more.

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to join the Earth Day Planning Committee. The committee is made up of about 25 members representing a wide variety of campus departments, student organizations, and majors.

With a few steps, cities can drastically reduce heat-related deaths

Heat is the deadliest natural disaster facing the United States – killing more people than hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes combined. The bulk of these deaths occur in cities, which are heating up about twice as fast as the rest of the planet.

The number of heat-related deaths is projected to more than double by 2050. A new study from Georgia Institute of Technology shows these deaths can be drastically reduced – and in some cases nearly eliminated – if city leaders and urban planners adapt a few basic strategies.