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The Georgia Institute of Technology has received a $43.6 million gift from the Institute of Paper Chemistry Foundation (IPCF). This major grant, one of the single largest gifts in Georgia Tech’s history, affirms the Institute’s position as a leading driver of the future of the forest bioproducts industry.

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) celebrated the father of landscape architecture Monday as it also launched its search for a faculty member to fill a newly endowed chair.

The Frederick Law Olmsted Symposium assembled six experts in sustainable urban infrastructure to talk about the man and the concepts he created. It was the start of a conversation about who can best advance the ideas of sustainability in our cities and suburbs as the new Olmsted Chair in CEE.

The newest tool in the future of transportation planning is in your hand.

OK, maybe your pocket. Or your purse.

It’s your Android smartphone. And with a quick app download, your phone can help Georgia Tech transportation researchers better understand how people get where they’re going and how much congestion they are facing on their commute (think: speeds on freeways and how you’re driving relative to the flow of traffic).

Researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) are developing a micro gas chromatograph (GC) for early detection of diseases in crops. About the size of a 9-volt battery, the technology’s portability could give farmers just the tool they need to quickly evaluate the health of their crops and address any possible threats immediately, potentially increasing yield by reducing crop losses.

Coming on the heels — and wheels — of National Bike Month, Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is rolling out a new bike rental program for students, called BuzzBike.

Beginning Monday, June 2, students may apply to rent a bike for a semester at a time.

Georgia Tech is pleased to announce a broader research mission, additional resources and a new name for the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST), one of Georgia Tech’s 10 interdisciplinary research institutes. IPST is being renamed the Renewable Bioproducts Institute (RBI) effective June 1, 2014.

 When making cellulosic ethanol from plants, one problem is what to do with a woody agricultural waste product called lignin. The old adage in the pulp industry has been that one can make anything from lignin except money.

A new review article in the journal Science points the way toward a future where lignin is transformed from a waste product into valuable materials such as low-cost carbon fiber for cars or bio-based plastics. Using lignin in this way would create new markets for the forest products industry and make ethanol-to-fuel conversion more cost-effective.

This month, Georgia Tech will join entities around the country to observe National Bike Month.

But at Tech, bicycles are an ever-present mode of transport, not just a recreational vehicle to be hauled out ceremonially once a year.

Tech has catapulted forward in recent years when it comes to campus bike infrastructure. 

There's more than one way to get to work. Nelson Silverio is an HR coordinator in the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering and depending on his daily circumstances he prefers to get to work by bike, bus, train, or, if absolutely necessary, by car. Here is what he had to say about being an alternative transportation user in Atlanta.

 

Are you already dreading your commute home this evening? Kari Watkins isn’t, and she doesn’t want you to either.

Watkins is the civil engineering professor who’s been all over the news lately thanks to the app she co-created, One Bus Away. She’s also a bike commuter who says you don’t have to be a “super cyclist” to ride through town on two wheels. In a city where car culture is endemic, Watkins advocates easier, cheaper and more environmentally friendly ways to get around.

 

Construction Project Prompts Development of Campus Stormwater Master Plan

Georgia Tech is renowned for transforming real-world challenges into teachable moments. Such was the case with the planning for the Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB) – currently under construction on 10th Street – a project that in turn led to the development of the 2013 Stormwater Master Plan.

As freshmen move out of their residence halls next week, a group of second-year students will be on hand to salvage some of the discarded pieces of their first year at college.

Alex Cheu is one of the students organizing Tech Treasure, an initiative that will bring Goodwill trailers to campus to accept donations of unwanted items during move-out.

Just in time for Earth Day, and for the sixth consecutive year, the Arbor Day Foundation has recognized Georgia Tech as a Tree Campus USA university.

For Hyacinth Ide, associate director of landscape services, the award reaffirms that Tech is doing something right.

“It highlights all the things we are doing that otherwise people would not know,” Ide said. “A beautiful tree canopy helps in recruiting students and faculty. Once they see the peaceful environment, they want to come in and know more about what we have [on campus].”

Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor were less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.

The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.

Major corporate executives and other thought leaders on the environment will converge at Georgia Tech Scheller College of Business at 4 p.m. on Thursday, May 1, to discuss “The Sustainability Advantage: The Art and Science of Creating Sustainable Value.”Hosted by the Center for Business Strategies for Sustainability (CBSS), the panel discussion in LeCraw Auditorium of Scheller College (800 West Peachtree Street) will feature:

A team of four students from the Georgia Tech developing a new electrical power grid technology with an Internet-like control architecture won the third annual ACC Clean Energy Challenge and the Department of Energy's $100,000 grand prize.

The Student Government Association is encouraging fellow student organizations to earn silver by going green through a new initiative called Silver Leaf certification.

The Silver Leaf program asks that student organizations commit to recycling at one event per semester. The Office of Solid Waste Management and Recycling provides recycling bins, so students must simply request a bin for their event in advance.

“The goal of the initiative is to change student behavior and promote overall sustainability practices,” said Rachit Kansal, co-chair of SGA’s sustainability committee.

Kick off your spring-cleaning efforts by gathering items for these Georgia Tech Earth Day Celebration programs: 

Looking for a great way to spend your Earth Day? Sign up to be an Earth Day Volunteer, and be part of one of the biggest events on campus!

Whether you’re hanging out with Captain Planet, or making fresh, organic popcorn, being an Earth Day Volunteer is good for you and for the planet! For details about all of the exciting volunteer opportunities on Earth Day, or to register as a volunteer,  visit www.earthday.gatech.edu/volunteers.html.

The mobile app OneBusAway, which tracks public transportation in real time, now includes arrival times for MARTA trains in addition to the MARTA buses and Georgia Tech shuttles already featured in the app.

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