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La Niña-like conditions associated with 2,500-year-long shutdown of coral reef growth

A new study has found that La Niña-like conditions in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Panamá were closely associated with an abrupt shutdown in coral reef growth that lasted 2,500 years. The study suggests that future changes in climate similar to those in the study could cause coral reefs to collapse in the future.

Georgia Tech’s NextBuzz system, developed by ISyE Professor John Bartholdi and team in conjunction with Georgia Tech’s Parking and Transportation Services office, received the prestigious Innovation award by the Georgia Transit Association for its implemented innovative ideas and problem-solving techniques in its transit system.

The Georgia Tech Earth Day Committee is now accepting submissions for its annual Leadership and Sustainable Initiatives awards.

Nominations are sought for individuals or groups who are making a positive environmental impact both on campus and beyond, either through a new initiative or a body of work. The deadline for nominations is Monday, March 10.

The Georgia Institute of Technology earned three out of a possible four stars from the Professional Grounds Management Society (PGMS) Landscape Management and Operations Accreditation program. PGMS accreditation focuses on three categories: environmental stewardship, economic performance and social responsibilities.

Dagmar Epsten, Georgia Tech master of architecture alumna and president of Atlanta-based Epsten Group, established the annual Epsten Environmental Vision competition at the School of Architecture in late 2014.

The 2015 competition will be held this spring in a senior studio that teaches students LEED principles along with a focus on sustainability and environmental issues. Students will work as teams to upcycle an early 20th-century single-story attached commercial building in downtown Atlanta for Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery, an artist-run non-profit.

Georgia Tech is laying the groundwork for its next undergraduate learning focus, which will provide students the opportunities to learn and serve around the theme “creating sustainable communities.”

The initiative known as Serve•Learn•Sustain is Tech’s newest Quality Enhancement Plan, an essential component for reaffirmation of accreditation where a university must develop a long-term plan of action that tangibly supports student learning and reflects the institute’s mission.

The Georgia Institute of Technology’s Scheller College of Business has received a $5 million commitment from the Ray C. Anderson Foundation to rename the Center for Business Strategies for Sustainability. To honor this commitment and Ray Anderson’s legacy, the Center will now be known as the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business.

A 1956 Industrial Engineering graduate of Georgia Tech, Anderson was a loyal and devoted supporter of his alma mater for more than five decades. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the Institute in 2011.

In the Jan. 23, 2015 issue of The Technique, Georgia Tech faculty Beril Toktay, Ellen Zegura, and Colin Potts explain a new core learning element for undergraduates, centered on the theme of "creating sustainable communities"

Before enrolling in Georgia Tech’s MBA Program, Brian Edgerton had long been interested in sustainability. “But when I came to Tech, I had the opportunity to embrace it,” he says.

Edgerton, MBA 2013, served as president of Georgia Tech’s Net Impact chapter during his studies. The Tech chapter, which earned Gold Standing from the national organization in 2013, is one of more than 300 worldwide, including 40,000 students and professional leaders who are focused on creating positive social and environmental change in the workplace and around the world.

At Georgia Tech, Decie Autin studied and trained to be an engineer, not a community relations expert. But when ExxonMobil selected her in 2008 to be the supervising project executive for the construction of a major new liquid natural gas pipeline, Autin knew that to be successful, she’d have to work closely with local families and landowners. It’s one of the many skills Autin has had to learn while moving up from front-line engineering to management.

If big problems demand big responses, then it’s only appropriate that the nation’s biggest engineering school steps up to address perhaps the nation’s biggest engineering challenge: energy.

For the 2014 football season, more than 25 tons of recyclable materials collected during Georgia Tech’s six home games were diverted from the landfill, setting a new record for the Institute’s Game Day Recycling Program. The diverted materials were collected inside Bobby Dodd Stadium and at tailgating areas around campus.

Dean Alford, EE 76, never expected to become the face of a coal plant.

A clean-cut businessman with snow-white hair and a matching mustache, he looks comfortable in a tailored suit with a pocket-square intricately styled into three points over his chest. Despite his manicured appearance, he has an easy presence and comfortable charm. His big smile and Southern accent that’s equal parts folksy and sophisticated are a testament to his many years in politics.

Adam N. Stulberg, an expert on energy and international security, joined the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs in 1998. As associate professor and co-director of the Center for International Strategy, Technology and Policy, he teaches courses in Eurasian politics and nuclear non-proliferation, among other subjects.

The former RAND consultant now consults for the defense department and policy think tanks. The Alumni Magazine asked him to share his thoughts on how energy influences today’s geopolitics.

 

How concerned should we be about climate change? Threats such as ISIS, ebola and shaky economies seem much more immediate and tangible than global warming. We asked two of Tech’s top experts in the field to discuss the issue.

Uncertainty Doesn’t Mean We Shouldn’t Take Action

By Judith Curry

LEDs reduced U.S. CO2 emissions by an estimated 12 million tons in 2013, produce the greatest amount of light for the energy used, and have the longest lifetime of any lighting source available. In recognition of the significant benefit to society created by the initial development and commercialization of LED technologies 20 years ago, five pioneers will receive the $500,000 Draper Prize for Engineering.

CAMBRIDGE, MA – LEDs reduced U.S. CO2 emissions by an estimated 12 million tons in 2013, produce the greatest amount of light for the energy used, and have the longest lifetime of any lighting source available. In recognition of the significant benefit to society created by the initial development and commercialization of LED technologies 20 years ago, five pioneers will receive the $500,000 Draper Prize for Engineering.

The southeastern United States is a natural laboratory for scientists studying how chemicals emitted by human activities and trees interact with each other and affect air quality and climate. A new study has found that certain emissions from cars and coal-fired power plants promote processes that transform naturally occurring emissions from trees into organic aerosols. Organic aerosols make up a substantial fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM) that can affect climate, air quality and human health.

Although fuel cells powered by methanol or hydrogen have been well studied, existing low temperature fuel cell technologies cannot directly use biomass because of the lack of an effective catalyst system for polymeric materials.

A School of Architecture graduate design and research studio created a vision, a framework, and a series of projects for the Ray Anderson Memorial Highway, which is a 16-mile segment of I-85 from the Alabama/Georgia border to the interchange with I-185 leading to Columbus. The Memorial Highway was recently designated the "Mission Zero Corridor" by the Georgia State Legislature. This designation is a commemoration of Ray Anderson’s legacy of sustainable industry with Mission Zero for the Interface Corporation.

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