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Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business is ranked eigth in Corporate Knights magazine’s Global 100 Sustainable MBA rankings for success at integrating sustainability into the school experience.

For this year’s ranking, Corporate Knights examined the top 100 master of business administration (MBA) programs listed in the Financial Times’ 2013 Global MBA ranking, determining which best prioritized sustainability through curriculum choices, dedicated institutes and centers, and relevant faculty research.

Researchers may soon have a better idea of how tiny particles of pollution are formed in the atmosphere. These particles, called aerosols, or particulate matter (PM), are hazardous to human health and contribute to climate change, but researchers know little about how their properties are shaped by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Unraveling this chemistry could someday lead to more effective policies to protect human health and the Earth’s climate.  

Georgia Tech hosts one of the largest Earth Day celebrations in the Southeast, with live music, more than 100 exhibitors, a green market, alternative fuel vehicle displays, environmental awards, interactive green challenges, and more.

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to join the Earth Day Planning Committee. The committee is made up of about 25 members representing a wide variety of campus departments, student organizations, and majors.

The increasing acidification of ocean waters caused by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels could rob sharks of their ability to sense the smell of food, a new study suggests.

Heat is the deadliest natural disaster facing the United States – killing more people than hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes combined. The bulk of these deaths occur in cities, which are heating up about twice as fast as the rest of the planet.

The number of heat-related deaths is projected to more than double by 2050. A new study from Georgia Institute of Technology shows these deaths can be drastically reduced – and in some cases nearly eliminated – if city leaders and urban planners adapt a few basic strategies.

Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.

Damaged coral reefs emit chemical cues that repulse young coral and fish, discouraging them from settling in the degraded habitat, according to new research. The study shows for the first time that coral larvae can smell the difference between healthy and damaged reefs when they decide where to settle.

Becoming a tradition in itself, Georgia Tech has once again earned accolades for its efforts in sustainability.

The Princeton Review named Tech to its seventh annual Green Honor Roll for the year 2015. Tech was one of 24 colleges and universities receiving the highest possible score of 99. More than 800 schools were evaluated for the annual listing. Tech has made the Green Honor Roll since the Princeton Review began tracking its Green Ratings.

Seismic events aren’t rare occurrences on Antarctica, where sections of the frozen desert can experience hundreds of micro-earthquakes an hour due to ice deformation. Some scientists call them icequakes. But in March of 2010, the ice sheets in Antarctica vibrated a bit more than usual because of something more than 3,000 miles away: the 8.8-magnitude Chilean earthquake.

A team of about 35 undergraduate and graduate students is about to embark on an ambitious four-year project to redesign a Chevrolet Camaro into a hybrid-electric car.

Georgia Institute of Technology is one of 16 universities participating in the Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition, EcoCAR 3. The U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors Company are among the sponsors.

The first of four new courses in sustainable transportation rolls out in Fall 2014 at Georgia Tech, thanks to $250,000 in matching funds from the Office of the Executive Vice President of Research.

Building on a theme that has gained momentum in associate professor Perry Yang’s annual international urban design studio, a group of city and regional planning, architecture, civil engineering, and public policy graduate students gathered together this spring to address the development issues of a rapidly urbanizing waterfront city in Southern China.  Sponsored by the local government and the Guangdong Urban and Rural Planning and Design Institute (GDUPI), Georgia Tech’s student and faculty group traveled to Guangzhou and Maoming, China, located adjacent to the Pearl River Delta regio

It’s 3:15 p.m. and the sun is setting at Anvers Island. Just off the Antarctic Peninsula, surrounded by 300-foot cliffs of ice, Jeannette Yen pauses outside Palmer Station to watch. The sun spills over the ice cliffs. The frozen landscape melts in a golden glow.

During a bitter winter in January 1998, Lisa Safstrom loaded herself and her bike onto a Greyhound bus in Boston to visit a friend in Atlanta. She planned to stay for a week. Instead, she moved here. 

“I was a bike messenger up there, and we worked in the worst weather,” Safstrom said. “I came down here in January, and it was 64 degrees.”

Safstrom continued working as a bike messenger in Atlanta, which eventually inspired her to enroll in graduate school at Georgia Tech in 2004 for City and Regional Planning. 

Steve Swant is not a green vigilante. He doesn’t drive an electric vehicle. He sometimes uses plastic bags at the grocery store. But as executive vice president of Administration and Finance at Georgia Tech, he’s doing what he can to make sure Tech is a sustainable operation.

“It’s my passion and my team’s passion,” said Swant, who has a background in architecture and urban planning. Swant’s been at Tech since 1996 and, in his nearly 20 years on campus, he has watched the campus get better and smarter about its sustainability practices.

The Georgia Institute of Technology has received a $43.6 million gift from the Institute of Paper Chemistry Foundation (IPCF). This major grant, one of the single largest gifts in Georgia Tech’s history, affirms the Institute’s position as a leading driver of the future of the forest bioproducts industry.

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) celebrated the father of landscape architecture Monday as it also launched its search for a faculty member to fill a newly endowed chair.

The Frederick Law Olmsted Symposium assembled six experts in sustainable urban infrastructure to talk about the man and the concepts he created. It was the start of a conversation about who can best advance the ideas of sustainability in our cities and suburbs as the new Olmsted Chair in CEE.

The newest tool in the future of transportation planning is in your hand.

OK, maybe your pocket. Or your purse.

It’s your Android smartphone. And with a quick app download, your phone can help Georgia Tech transportation researchers better understand how people get where they’re going and how much congestion they are facing on their commute (think: speeds on freeways and how you’re driving relative to the flow of traffic).

Researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) are developing a micro gas chromatograph (GC) for early detection of diseases in crops. About the size of a 9-volt battery, the technology’s portability could give farmers just the tool they need to quickly evaluate the health of their crops and address any possible threats immediately, potentially increasing yield by reducing crop losses.

Georgia Tech's Scheller College of Business was recently named one of the grand prize winners for the Dr. Alfred N. and Lynn Manos Page Prize for Sustainability Issues in Business Curricula.

The Page Prize was launched in the fall of 2008 by the Darla Moore School of Business to encourage efforts to expose business students to state-of-the-art environmental sustainability knowledge. 

Coming on the heels — and wheels — of National Bike Month, Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is rolling out a new bike rental program for students, called BuzzBike.

Beginning Monday, June 2, students may apply to rent a bike for a semester at a time.

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