green buzz

The forecast calls for sunny weather this week in Austin, Texas, which is good news for 11 Georgia Tech students whose solar-powered car – the Endeavour – makes its racing debut there this Thursday at the Formula Sun Grand Prix.

The annual competition pits student-built cars from 12 North American universities against one another to test their handling of curves, braking and acceleration, all powered by the sun. The winner is determined by the total number of laps completed during three days of racing.

Tech's farmers market season ends with the spring semester, but around Atlanta, the season is just beginning.

This month's issue of The Recycling Buzz guides you to local farmers markets in town. It also introduces you to a student member of the Solid Waste Management and Recycling team. Read or download (but please, don't print) the Recycling Buzz (pdf).

Adding to Georgia Tech’s catalog of sustainability honors, the Institute in recent months put three new LEED buildings on its list, which now includes one of the largest academic buildings to earn LEED Platinum certification.

If urban farming is the cure for food deserts, Steven Van Ginkel may be the man to lead us to the oasis.

The Georgia Tech campus is frequently lauded as a friendly place for cyclists, even being named a silver-level Bicycle Friendly University by the League of American Bicyclists last year.

With a growing number of cyclists on campus and May being National Bike Month, now is a good time to be reminded of safety measures all cyclists can take to enhance the safety of themselves, those around them and their equipment.

The 2013 Georgia Tech Earth Day Celebration was a time to celebrate the many elements of earth, as attendees came out on a wet spring day to celebrate their devotion to Mother Nature.

This month's Recycling Buzz includes photos of the event, as well as information about recipients of the festival's annual awards. This issue also highlights upcoming events in the area, including the Sustainable Atlanta Roundtable on June 7 and the Collegiate Sports Sustainability Summit being hosted on campus June 25-26.

Representatives from colleges and universities across the nation will gather at Georgia Tech June 25-26 to discuss how athletics and sports programs can be more environmentally responsible at the third annual Collegiate Sports Sustainability Summit. 

The conference, which will be held in the Wardlaw Center, is open to student groups, athletics, recreation, sustainability, facilities, food service and recycling departments from all campuses. 

The Earth Day buzz has hit campus, and the Recycling Buzz has all the details for planning your celebration.

This month's issue features the full Earth Day schedule, as well as information about Tech Beautification Day, electronics recycling and other upcoming events. Read or download (but please, don't print) the Recycling Buzz (pdf).

On-campus residents who want to help Georgia Tech be more energy efficient have the opportuntiy to help the Institute "Flip the Switch" in the Campus Conservation Nationals competition.

Tech will compete against more than 100 other colleges and universities in this energy and water conservation competition. Building Captains are needed from each campus dormitory to help Tech achieve the greatest energy and water reduction levels in its residence halls.

Solar cells are just like leaves, capturing the sunlight and turning it into energy. It’s fitting that they can now be made partially from trees.

Georgia Institute of Technology and Purdue University researchers have developed efficient solar cells using natural substrates derived from plants such as trees. Just as importantly, by fabricating them on cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates, the solar cells can be quickly recycled in water at the end of their lifecycle.

In anticipation of the annual campus Earth Day Celebration on April 19, every Friday until then will be a chance to hunt down tokens that can be redeemed for prizes at an Earth Day booth. 

Each Friday, with the exception of March 22, the Earth Day Planning Committee will hide a Find-it Friday token in a "green" location somewhere on campus. If you find a token, bring it to the information booth at the Earth Day Celebration from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and exchange it for a prize

Kick off your spring-cleaning efforts by gathering items to contribute to Georgia Tech’s Earth Day efforts.

Until April 5, members of the campus community may donate used athletic shoes, clothing, E-waste or office supplies for one of the following Earth Day projects:

When faculty, students, and staff return to the Mason Building this summer, they won't have to worry about moisture damage if they lay a book down near one of the more than 300 windows that line the 90,000 square-foot structure.

That's because the Mason Building is getting an $800,000 window makeover, thanks to a recent decision by the Institute and the State of Georgia to fund the much-needed improvement.

Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) is generally regarded as the father of American landscape architecture. Among his works in twenty-four U.S. states and Washington, D.C., is the iconic design of Central Park in New York City. In Atlanta, his legacy is seen in the Druid Hills neighborhood near Emory University.

Scientists are now better able to examine rare methane gas samples recovered from deep beneath the seafloor using innovative tools developed by Georgia Tech.  

An international group of scientists recently used the tools to conduct groundbreaking research that could advance the understanding of how methane contained in marine sediment may be used as a viable energy source.

Georgia Tech Scheller College of Business is establishing the Center on Business Strategies for Sustainability, thanks to a three-year, $750,000 grant recently awarded by the Ray C. Anderson Foundation.

Through its focus on sustainable business practices, which aim to minimize negative impact on the environment and society, the center plans to:

In the most recent issue of Up With the Green and Gold, learn about the formation of the GT Green Alliance, a new collaborative of students working toward campus sustainability.

Hyacinth Ide talks about Tech's recent designation as a Tree Campus USA, and the Earth Day committee calls for nominations for multiple awards. Read up in the January/February issue of Up With the Green and Gold (download pdf at right).

The Georgia Tech Earth Day committee seeks nominations for two awards that recognize members of the Georgia Tech community that have demonstrated a commitment to making a positive impact in how people think about and use the planet's raw materials.

Members of the campus community are invited to submit nominations for:

Atlanta’s transportation network includes railroads, MARTA trains and buses, freeways, bike paths and the world’s busiest airport. Georgia Tech alumni and faculty have played a significant role in shaping that infrastructure, and now Ramblin’ Wrecks are helping plan Atlanta’s transportation systems of the future.Adapt, Improvise, Innovate

Keith Golden, CE 86, MS CE 89, and Todd Long, CE 89, MS CE 90, are the commissioner and deputy commissioner, respectively, of the Georgia Department of Transportation.

Rolls of tubing, uncoiling from helicopters, creating new pipelines in mere minutes; human waste, treated by the sun instead of an expensive sewer system. Is this the infrastructure of the future? If some recent Georgia Tech grads have anything to do with it, the answer will be yes. 

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