green buzz

As the observance of National Bike Month comes to a close at the end of May, campus bicycle enthusiasts will still put one wheel after the other in their work to make Georgia Tech and its surrounding areas more bicycle-friendly. 

Reducing carbon emissions is a topic of conversation around the nation and world, including on Tech’s campus. Last semester, students taking an earth and atmospheric sciences class titled “Energy, the Environment and Society” teamed up to see which group could reduce greatest amount of emissions over an eight-week period. The winning team in the Carbon Reduction Challenge succeeded in keeping 94,000 pounds of CO2 out of the air for a cost savings of $10,000.

How many pounds of goods were donated by students moving out of dorms? Which students and campus organizations were honored at Earth Day 2012? Find out in the May issue of the Recycling Buzz, an online newsletter from the Office of Solid Waste Management and Recycling.Read or download the May issue now (pdf).

Georgia Tech has been awarded $3.1 million from the U.S. Department of Energy for research and scholarships focused on nuclear energy.The Obama Administration handed out a total of $47 million to 46 schools across the country on May 8. 

Daniel Poneman, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy, said $3.1 million will go to three research projects at Georgia Tech focused on developing new and advanced nuclear reactor designs and technologies, while addressing their cost, safety and security.

The Georgia Institute of Technology has received a $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The program funds individuals worldwide to explore ideas that can break the mold in how persistent global health and development challenges are solved.

Can a shuttered automotive plant become a catalyst for healthy living? Can four cities, two counties, and the world’s busiest airport, create a thriving district filled with healthy options and opportunity? The Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (CQGRD) at Georgia Tech studied these questions regarding redevelopment plans for the former Ford Atlanta Assembly Plant alongside Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Climate and energy policy professor Marilyn Brown has been named an inaugural ambassador in U.S. Department of Energy / MIT Women in Clean Energy Program for the United States.

For the third time in 2012, Georgia Tech has been recognized on a national level for its sustainable efforts. Most recently, Tech was among 15 schools highlighted by the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) for reducing carbon emissions, maximizing resources, lowering operating costs and allowing members of the Tech community to also engage in good practices.

With the end of another school year and as members move on from Georgia Tech, the Bicycle Infrastructure Improvement Committee (BIIC) seeks new student representatives to contribute their efforts to improving the bicycle climate of campus.

From research to grand challenges, documentary films to exercise, the Earth Day Planning Committee has put together a week of free events for the entire campus community to enjoy.

Mekong Green Tech's technology to clean up rural Vietnam's rural brick-making industry won first place in the 2012 Ideas to SERVE (I2S) Competition at Georgia Tech College of Management.

Open to all Georgia Tech students and recent alumni, the I2S competition involves innovative business concepts that could help improve society or preserve the environment. The finals were held on April 4 following a poster showcase on April 2.

Just weeks after being recognized locally as the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition’s Partner of the Year, Tech earned the national honor of being named a Bicycle Friendly University by the League of American Bicyclists. Tech earned a silver designation among the 2012 group of honorees, making it the easternmost university to earn that ranking or higher.

Splitting hydrogen and oxygen from water using conventional electrolysis techniques requires considerable amounts of electrical energy. But green plants produce oxygen from water efficiently using a catalytic technique powered by sunlight – a process that is part of photosynthesis and so effective that it is the Earth’s major source of oxygen.

With sustainable living becoming a more common concern in homes throughout the country, many people are doing what they can to live greener. However, two recent Georgia Tech graduates are taking these ideas further, thinking big to create ways for major companies to reduce their energy consumption.

The Georgia Institute of Technology announced today that it will be upgrading all of its residence hall laundries, bringing them up-to-date environmentally.

“Georgia Tech strives to be a leader in sustainability and environmentally conscious programs,” said Rich Steele, acting executive director of Georgia Tech Auxiliary Services. “Our laundries need new equipment on a regular cycle and we wanted to make sure the improvements included energy efficient equipment.”

In the United States alone, government and private industry together invest more than $3 billion per year in nanotechnology research and development, and globally the total is much higher. What will be the long-run economic returns from these investments, not only in new jobs and product sales, but also from improvements in sustainability?

Spring is finally here – temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming and students are itching to spend their time outdoors. However, campus has undergone many changes during the past year, limiting recreational use in some areas.

Don’t be discouraged – the “Please Keep off the Grass” signs are coming down soon, and there are still plenty of ideal locations for a game of Frisbee, sunbathing, reading and soaking up good conversation and sunlight with friends.

Couch Park

The co-op program at Georgia Tech allows students the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom to paid positions with companies and organizations in a real world setting.  Ginny MacGowan, an undergraduate student in the H.

Kick off your spring-cleaning efforts by gathering items to contribute to Georgia Tech’s Earth Day efforts.

Members of the campus community may donate used athletic shoes, clothing, E-waste, office supplies or books for one of the following Earth Day projects:

The spring semester marches along, and the March issue of the Recycling Buzz newsletter is now available. 

Preparations for Georgia Tech’s 15th Annual Earth Day Celebration have begun. The Earth Day Celebration will be on Friday, April 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tech Walk and volunteer registration is now open.

News by Subject