green buzz

Georgia Tech will host its second Energy Expo next week, continuing to position itself as a leader and hub of energy-related activity in the region and nation.

Hosted by the Energy Club, the Expo will take place April 2–3 at the Student Center, bringing students and others in the energy community together to focus on the scientific, policy, and business elements surrounding the greater issue of energy. The two-day event includes sessions on topics such as legal and regulatory framework, entrepreneurship and access to capital in the energy field, and new technologies.

Each year the Earth Day celebration at Georgia Tech attracts people from not only campus, but also from Atlanta and the entire Southeast. Right now, donations are being accepted for the event’s clothing swap and volunteers are wanted for day-of assistance.

While many students left campus last Friday for a well-deserved break from classes, one group boarded a plane for South America, where they’ll spend the week applying their research in remote communities in Bolivia.

The students in CEE 4803 — a course called Environmental Technology in the Developing World — have spent the semester preparing for the 10-day trip. They’ll be evaluating different methods for testing air and water quality but will have to do so outside the comfort of their usual lab and equipment.

A multi-disciplinary team of CoA graduate students from Georgia Tech earned honorable mention at the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Student Urban Design competition. The team is made up of Desmond Johnson (M.Arch), Mario Rodas (M.Arch), Nathan Shi (MSUD), Elizabeth Vason (MCRP) and Ai-Lien Vuong, (M.Arch/MCRP).

Georgia Tech’s NextBuzz system, developed by ISyE Professor John Bartholdi and team in conjunction with Georgia Tech’s Parking and Transportation Services office, received the prestigious Innovation award by the Georgia Transit Association for its implemented innovative ideas and problem-solving techniques in its transit system.

The Georgia Tech Earth Day Committee is now accepting submissions for its annual Leadership and Sustainable Initiatives awards.

Nominations are sought for individuals or groups who are making a positive environmental impact both on campus and beyond, either through a new initiative or a body of work. The deadline for nominations is Monday, March 10.

Dagmar Epsten, Georgia Tech master of architecture alumna and president of Atlanta-based Epsten Group, established the annual Epsten Environmental Vision competition at the School of Architecture in late 2014.

The 2015 competition will be held this spring in a senior studio that teaches students LEED principles along with a focus on sustainability and environmental issues. Students will work as teams to upcycle an early 20th-century single-story attached commercial building in downtown Atlanta for Eyedrum Art & Music Gallery, an artist-run non-profit.

Georgia Tech is laying the groundwork for its next undergraduate learning focus, which will provide students the opportunities to learn and serve around the theme “creating sustainable communities.”

The initiative known as Serve•Learn•Sustain is Tech’s newest Quality Enhancement Plan, an essential component for reaffirmation of accreditation where a university must develop a long-term plan of action that tangibly supports student learning and reflects the institute’s mission.

In the Jan. 23, 2015 issue of The Technique, Georgia Tech faculty Beril Toktay, Ellen Zegura, and Colin Potts explain a new core learning element for undergraduates, centered on the theme of "creating sustainable communities"

Before enrolling in Georgia Tech’s MBA Program, Brian Edgerton had long been interested in sustainability. “But when I came to Tech, I had the opportunity to embrace it,” he says.

Edgerton, MBA 2013, served as president of Georgia Tech’s Net Impact chapter during his studies. The Tech chapter, which earned Gold Standing from the national organization in 2013, is one of more than 300 worldwide, including 40,000 students and professional leaders who are focused on creating positive social and environmental change in the workplace and around the world.

Dean Alford, EE 76, never expected to become the face of a coal plant.

A clean-cut businessman with snow-white hair and a matching mustache, he looks comfortable in a tailored suit with a pocket-square intricately styled into three points over his chest. Despite his manicured appearance, he has an easy presence and comfortable charm. His big smile and Southern accent that’s equal parts folksy and sophisticated are a testament to his many years in politics.

Adam N. Stulberg, an expert on energy and international security, joined the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs in 1998. As associate professor and co-director of the Center for International Strategy, Technology and Policy, he teaches courses in Eurasian politics and nuclear non-proliferation, among other subjects.

The former RAND consultant now consults for the defense department and policy think tanks. The Alumni Magazine asked him to share his thoughts on how energy influences today’s geopolitics.

 

How concerned should we be about climate change? Threats such as ISIS, ebola and shaky economies seem much more immediate and tangible than global warming. We asked two of Tech’s top experts in the field to discuss the issue.

Uncertainty Doesn’t Mean We Shouldn’t Take Action

By Judith Curry

Although fuel cells powered by methanol or hydrogen have been well studied, existing low temperature fuel cell technologies cannot directly use biomass because of the lack of an effective catalyst system for polymeric materials.

A School of Architecture graduate design and research studio created a vision, a framework, and a series of projects for the Ray Anderson Memorial Highway, which is a 16-mile segment of I-85 from the Alabama/Georgia border to the interchange with I-185 leading to Columbus. The Memorial Highway was recently designated the "Mission Zero Corridor" by the Georgia State Legislature. This designation is a commemoration of Ray Anderson’s legacy of sustainable industry with Mission Zero for the Interface Corporation.

Georgia Tech’s Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) has been selected to receive a grant of $39,675 by the Georgia Environmental Finance Authority for the purchase and installation of electric vehicle (EV) chargers.

These funds will help Georgia Tech expand its EV charging program by installing nine dual-port Level II chargers in visitor-accessible locations including near the Student Center, Bobby Dodd Stadium, and Howey Physics.

Some things are best left to nature, and controlling invasive vegetation is no exception.

Using an environmentally friendly approach to rid an area on campus of kudzu, Georgia Tech is hosting several four-legged, wooly friends over the next two weeks to assist in removing — or eating — the rapidly growing weed.

At the 2015 Earth Day celebration, hundreds of people will receive T-shirts that they'll wear on campus for years to come — and they could be sporting your design.

The Earth Day planning committee is holding a design contest for this year's T-shirt around the theme "Small Acts, Big Impacts." The winning designer will earn $500. 

In designing a car, creativity is the rope that ties all the different parts together. It’s responsible for the design, look, and feel of the car. When the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asks you to expand upon those features to make a car more environmentally friendly, those creative components have to be taken a step further.

Georgia Tech hosts one of the largest Earth Day celebrations in the Southeast, with live music, more than 100 exhibitors, a green market, alternative fuel vehicle displays, environmental awards, interactive green challenges, and more.

Students, faculty, and staff are invited to join the Earth Day Planning Committee. The committee is made up of about 25 members representing a wide variety of campus departments, student organizations, and majors.

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